Wire from shunt trip breaker to ansul system

kylelee

Member
Location
多伦多
Hi I need to connect the shun trip breaker to ansul system st terminal and n1 terminal block . But from the panel to the system what kind of wire i should use? Should i run a emt with t90 or bx?

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LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
You can use any typical wiring method, such as adding wires to an existing conduit that runs to the right places (if conduit size permits), MC cable, wires in EMT, even NM if not otherwise prohibited.

One thing to check: Make sure that either the shunt-trip coil can withstand constant power applied, or that the applied power drops when the shunt-trip trips. Let us know if you need help with that.
 

kylelee

Member
Location
多伦多
You can use any typical wiring method, such as adding wires to an existing conduit that runs to the right places (if conduit size permits), MC cable, wires in EMT, even NM if not otherwise prohibited.

One thing to check: Make sure that either the shunt-trip coil can withstand constant power applied, or that the applied power drops when the shunt-trip trips. Let us know if you need help with that.
Just curious what kind of wire people usually use cuz this shunt trip wire looks that small. So looks wires in emt is suitable for me

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hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Usually just stay with the size of wire the control circuit breaker dictates, 15 amp, #14, 20 amp #12. The fire suppression contact is usually rated for only 3-5 amps, some may be more depending on the manufacture. As Larry said, some shuntrip breakers are not rated for constant voltage, but most are. Square D has clearing contacts that open when the breaker is tripped or turned off.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
What is T90 and BX? Are those chapter 3 wiring methods?
T90 - maybe "thermostat wire"?

BX - most likely type AC cable, or some even lump MC into that designation though BX originally was a brand name of AC cable I believe, and is sort of like how many call NM cable "romex".

Either could be fine - though seems most these systems would be using 120 volt shunt trip coil and "thermostat wire" would normally be limited to use with a class 2 control circuit.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Usually just stay with the size of wire the control circuit breaker dictates, 15 amp, #14, 20 amp #12. The fire suppression contact is usually rated for only 3-5 amps, some may be more depending on the manufacture. As Larry said, some shuntrip breakers are not rated for constant voltage, but most are. Square D has clearing contacts that open when the breaker is tripped or turned off.
The electrical switches in the ANSUL AUTOMAN control head are rated at 21 amps/250VAC, 2HP/250VAC, or 1HP/125VAC. The alarm switch has a much lower rating.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
The electrical switches in the ANSUL AUTOMAN control head are rated at 21 amps/250VAC, 2HP/250VAC, or 1HP/125VAC. The alarm switch has a much lower rating.
Most I have seen are low amp lever type micro switches. Not saying the 21 amp switch is not out there, but the majority are micro switches.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Every fire-suppression system I have wired (dozens) has had microswitches with that same 21a rating.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Most I have seen are low amp lever type micro switches. Not saying the 21 amp switch is not out there, but the majority are micro switches.
The alarm switch has two screw connections (COM & N.O.) and one spade connection (N.C.). The electrical switches are three spade connections.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
The alarm switch has two screw connections (COM & N.O.) and one spade connection (N.C.). The electrical switches are three spade connections.
All of them I have hooked up have spade connections with pigtails. Factory wired controllers may have screw terminals controlling factory installed contactors and starters, but your average off the shelf plain jane head has two to three microswitches with pigtails.
 
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