Service Disconnect

quantum

Senior Member
Location
LA
I'm arguing back and forth with an engineer. He is telling me that the utility owned, fused disconnect above the meter, is the 'service disconnect.' Can this be considered the 'service disconnect' for the premises? I'm reviewing 230 Part VI for clues.
 

rc/retired

Member
Location
Bellevue, Colorado
Occupation
Master Electrician/Inspector retired
What code are you under? 2020 NEC 230.85 is a new section & section 230.82 was new in 2017, I think.
2017 section addresses meter disconnects & the 2020 section emergency disconnects.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
If the disconnect is upstream of the meter wouldn't it be locked by the POCO? How would the fuses be accessible to the customer?
 

Seekthetruth

Member
Location
Florida
Occupation
Electrical
A metal service gutter feeding 2 disconnects with pvc nipples with two sets of service conductors 3/0 from meter. What is the best way to bond the gutter?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
A metal service gutter feeding 2 disconnects with pvc nipples with two sets of service conductors 3/0 from meter. What is the best way to bond the gutter?
Please don't ask the same question in two different threads. Please respond to this question here:
 

rc/retired

Member
Location
Bellevue, Colorado
Occupation
Master Electrician/Inspector retired
Please don't ask the same question in two different threads. Please respond to this question here:
My bad. The question was asked in this thread & I felt it should go to grounding & bonding & sent him there.
Ron
 

quantum

Senior Member
Location
LA
f the disconnect is upstream of the meter wouldn't it be locked by the POCO? How would the fuses be accessible to the customer?
That's my concern as well. How can the utility disconnect be considered the service disconnect? Let me give the BROAD picture:

We have Disconnect A (Utility owned, fused, on the line side of the meter), Disconnect B (Customer owned, fused, load side of the mter). Their design calls for us to add a "non-fused" disconnect on this same post, let's call it Disconnect C, and energize it from the line side of Disconnect B.

My argument back to engineering is that this disconnect does not disconnect the meter, and therefor, should not be installed in this manner. I'm also arguing that the fused transfer switch it feeds is not located directly adjacent to it (20 feet away underground). I've asked them to consider wiring this to the load side of the disconnect or changing it to a fused disconnect. They keep shooting me down because they consider Disconnect A to be the service disconnect.

I'm think they are wrong, but I can't find anything int he code to assert that Disc B, not A, in this scenario is the service disconnect.
 
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quantum

Senior Member
Location
LA
What code are you under? 2020 NEC 230.85 is a new section & section 230.82 was new in 2017, I think.
2017 section addresses meter disconnects & the 2020 section emergency disconnects.
Look at my previous post just above here, I do not believe it meets any of the requirements of 230.82.
 

quantum

Senior Member
Location
LA
If the disconnect is upstream of the meter wouldn't it be locked by the POCO? How would the fuses be accessible to the customer?
A service disconnect has to be readily accessible correct? What if the utility company does indeed lock it out? There are just so many things I see wrong with this install design. Not to count their misplacement of EGC's on this service side install (that they consider feeders apparently).
 
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quantum

Senior Member
Location
LA
A service disconnect has to be readily accessible correct? What if the utility company does indeed lock it out? There are just so many things I see wrong with this install design. Not to count their misplacement of EGC's on this service side install (that they consider feeders apparently).
To answer my own question here, a locked enclosure requiring keys can still be considered readily accessible (Definitions). If the utility company possesses the keys, however, is this still readily accessible?
 

jap

Senior Member
To answer my own question here, a locked enclosure requiring keys can still be considered readily accessible (Definitions). If the utility company possesses the keys, however, is this still readily accessible?
Regardless of readily accessible, I don't think the power company will allow access to unmetered power.

At least I know ours wont.

JAP>
 
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