Oregon General Supervising Electricians Exam

Cow

Senior Member
Location
Eastern Oregon
I took it 7 years ago.

At the time, the way to do it was to take one of John Powell's supervisor prep courses and then take the test as soon as you could after taking his classes.

He wrote all the different versions of all the electrical tests the state uses, so you were being taught in his classes the same way you'd take the test. I'm not sure if that's a conflict of interest or not.

I was told a couple years after I took the test, they made it easier as the passing rate was still too low.

But, this topic still comes up every once in a while on here, so it must still be tougher than other states, because I don't see other states brought up on here. Just being a member on this forum tells me you have a better than average shot at it.

When I took it, it was obscure code articles for the main code questions, and an industrial warehouse with equipment and office space for the long drawn out calculation. If you were wrong on one of the calcs, all the other calcs that piggybacked off of it were wrong as well and you failed the test.

You need to fully understand art. 220.
 

AC\DC

Senior Member
Location
Florence,Oregon,Lane
Occupation
EC
I took it about 6 months ago. I took it three times :ashamed1: failed the 12 question calculation part by one both times. The Code part was easy since its open book. Every test had 7-8 questions that were tied together. Had some PV questions.

If I did not pass the third time I was going to take John Powell's
courses. Like Cow Said 220 is a must to understand.

I filled my code book on the back blank pages with every formula and some question similar to the ones I remembered while taking the other ones. Studying annex D very heavly helped also, just looked back there on my highlited notes when stumped.

You should be good though, Your smarter than me lol.​
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
I took it about 6 months ago.... The Code part was easy since its open book.
I suggest that it was only easy because you were already -very- familiar with the code, and only needed the book for the details! Unless you know where in the book to look, it's going to be a difficult exam!
 

AC\DC

Senior Member
Location
Florence,Oregon,Lane
Occupation
EC
I suggest that it was only easy because you were already -very- familiar with the code, and only needed the book for the details! Unless you know where in the book to look, it's going to be a difficult exam!
Well prior to studying Mikes complete library I took a 2 year absents from electrical work(cold turkey). So I studied his material for 6 months. Without that I would of failed it.

for the Code part, you need Tom Henry key finders. I used that for about 50% of the questions

I Also went threw my uglies, sat down and did every example question in their book.
 
I took it about 6 months ago. I took it three times :ashamed1: failed the 12 question calculation part by one both times. The Code part was easy since its open book. Every test had 7-8 questions that were tied together. Had some PV questions.

If I did not pass the third time I was going to take John Powell's
courses. Like Cow Said 220 is a must to understand.

I filled my code book on the back blank pages with every formula and some question similar to the ones I remembered while taking the other ones. Studying annex D very heavly helped also, just looked back there on my highlited notes when stumped.

You should be good though, Your smarter than me lol.​
Thanks for the tips! I’ve started the notes in the back of the code book. My instructor suggested the Henry’s key word index, which is very helpful. The tools are all there, but the consensus seems to be practice, practice, practice. I’m trying to do at least 1 practice calculation per day.
 

AC\DC

Senior Member
Location
Florence,Oregon,Lane
Occupation
EC
Thanks for the tips! I’ve started the notes in the back of the code book. My instructor suggested the Henry’s key word index, which is very helpful. The tools are all there, but the consensus seems to be practice, practice, practice. I’m trying to do at least 1 practice calculation per day.
Have you taken the test yet Electricguy
 
I have taken it 3 times , get a 89-91% on the 52 question every time, fail the 12 question. there is at least 1 question that feeds the next 3-7 questions so if you miss the first one you fail. I have seen office and repair areas with a store and a warehouse all in the same building don't forget your sign circuits, know your load calculations, multi family and derating also. you can have hand written notes in your code book. also bring a copy of the oregon speciality codes (i have every exclusion or addition for the 2017 code table 1E in 305? written in my book so i have it at my fingertips (the 2020 will be code in october if nothing changes). I was asked questions like how many hours are required for a restricted energy a license (something like that) another one is how far can a renewable energy license connect the panels to inverters , disconnect, service or something like that.
 
I took it 7 years ago.

At the time, the way to do it was to take one of John Powell's supervisor prep courses and then take the test as soon as you could after taking his classes.

He wrote all the different versions of all the electrical tests the state uses, so you were being taught in his classes the same way you'd take the test. I'm not sure if that's a conflict of interest or not.

I was told a couple years after I took the test, they made it easier as the passing rate was still too low.

But, this topic still comes up every once in a while on here, so it must still be tougher than other states, because I don't see other states brought up on here. Just being a member on this forum tells me you have a better than average shot at it.

When I took it, it was obscure code articles for the main code questions, and an industrial warehouse with equipment and office space for the long drawn out calculation. If you were wrong on one of the calcs, all the other calcs that piggybacked off of it were wrong as well and you failed the test.

You need to fully understand art. 220.
I took the exam back in 1996 sounds like the same exam you took. The second part calculations were very long and drawn out...IIRC it was two questions. I have never forgotten to include a sign circuit after that exam...LOL. You will need that understanding of art. 220 inside and out!
 
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sorry got called away, I also find chapter 9 helpful with conductor fill quick lookup of how many conductors in a pipe. I have a question on this site,
"Office receptacle calculations help", this was the first or second question (very similar) on 2 tests one had 3 more question that used the info the other had 7 questions based on this answer my question is not exact but if you read the question you will get the idea , things like minimum feeder size, maximum breaker size and unbalanced neutral current were the follow on questions. hope this helps you out and if you can give me the code reff for the dedicated receptacles i would appreciate it I thought i was doing it correctly but maybe not.
 
I took the exam back in 1996 sounds like the same exam you took. The second part calculations were very long and drawn out...IIRC it was two questions. I have never forgotten to include a sign circuit after that exam...LOL. You will need that understanding of art. 220 inside and out!
I was told by a guy that just took Toms class that he failed the first time and they have changed the tests,(he said, Tom commented a lot of guys were complaining due to the changes) but he passed on his second shot in december.
 
What is this exam, something between a J-man and contractor exam?
contractors is easy compared to this test. You can hold a contractors license as long as you employ a "signing supervisor" (others call master, in Oregon as a signing supervisor you can plan layout and install ANY electrical system or service) and post the required bond.
that test is more about bidding and the legal issues. the J man test in oregon is the 52 question test 3 hours, for supervisors that test and the 12 questions in 4 hours, 12 question may not sound like much but I have barely finished each time, my last PJ plant journeyman took the full 3 hours to finish the 52 questions and he thought he failed but passed. if you fail either part you have to take them both again.
The reason I did not take it in my youth was it was less than 10% pass rate, now at 60 I have a supervisor that works for me part time but he is retiring at the end of this cycle so I need to pass it or find another part time person.
 
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Location
USA
Occupation
Student
contractors is easy compared to this test. You can hold a contractors license as long as you employ a "signing supervisor" (others call master, in Oregon as a signing supervisor you can plan layout and install ANY electrical system or service) and post the required bond.
that test is more about bidding and the legal issues. the J man test in oregon is the 52 question test 3 hours, for supervisors that test and the 12 questions in 4 hours, 12 question may not sound like much but I have barely finished each time, my last PJ plant journeyman took the full 3 hours to finish the 52 questions and he thought he failed but passed. if you fail either part you have to take them both again.
The reason I did not take it in my youth was it was less than 10% pass rate, now at 60 I have a supervisor that works for me part time but he is retiring at the end of this cycle so I need to pass it or find another part time person.
Thank you for sharing your experience!
As for me, the resolution and the process itself went fine. I had more difficulties with writing work. It was pretty hard for me. Writing has never been my forte, so I turned to this service for help https://edubirdie.com/ieee-citation-generator The result was good and I successfully passed this exam and the written part of the assignment.
Thanks

Charles
 
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