Is Conduit or ENT required for CAT5e Cable Transition From Drop Ceiling to Room?

inq

Member
Location
98855
Occupation
Systems Integrator
We have some patch panels and a punch-down block that tie together about 12 CAT5e cables. This is all mounted to a piece of plywood bolted to the wall. The CAT5e cables transitions out of the drop ceiling through a 1" hole in a ceiling tile, down the wall, and then onto the plywood surface.

Are there any code requirements for how CAT5e cable should transition out of the drop ceiling? Do they need to be protected by ENT, conduit, or something else? Is a hole in the ceiling tile suffenciate & and up to code?
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
That's fine although it could be a little neater.

Interesting picture. I wonder where that huge cable tray is going that those few cables couldn't be routed up in the ceiling.

-Hal
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
The NEC is for protection from shock and fires, Cat 5e is not likely to cause either...however there are some POE rules to be aware of.
The NEC does not care if your data circuit does not work due to interference.
You want to avoid using cable ties on the bundled cables. Typically I would run the cables in a NM surface raceway, Panduit type.
 

tallgirl

Senior Member
How about this one?
πŸ˜…πŸ˜…πŸ˜…
That should be a firing offense.

The test labs at work at a bit like that in places. Whenever I visit to test or debug a new controller, I'm surprised the technicians can figure anything out. It would be more efficient to come in on a weekend, sort all that crap out, take a Monday off, then not have to try and figure out where all the wires come and go for the rest of eternity.
 

tallgirl

Senior Member
The NEC is for protection from shock and fires, Cat 5e is not likely to cause either...however there are some POE rules to be aware of.
The NEC does not care if your data circuit does not work due to interference.
You want to avoid using cable ties on the bundled cables. Typically I would run the cables in a NM surface raceway, Panduit type.
Unless you mean the poster should be using some other means of tying the cables together, there's nothing wrong with cable ties. The main risk is having to add or remove cables from the bundle, and the fact that zip-ties are non-reusable. When making up large bundles, such as in a network closet or server rack, there's nothing at all wrong with bundling them. The only time I wouldn't use zip-ties is if the cabling is going to change, and then I'd user the hook-and-loop variety.
 

tallgirl

Senior Member
Yeah, don't cinch them up too tight and zip-ties are fine. IT wienies are probably dealing with bundles that get changed a lot, and that's their real motivation.

There's also a product that looks a bit like what's used to pull conductors which can be used, but it's a pain in the butt.
 

steven765

Member
Location
earth
Occupation
engineer
Our network team went above and beyond they ran the panduit tray at teach drop up to the ceiling at a 60degree angle after they had extended the drop ceiling metalwork in a box around it. Looks really good, so far overboard.
 

steven765

Member
Location
earth
Occupation
engineer
Trying to make "IT wienies" look respectable, are you? :)

-Hal
The more i think about it, that was likely contracted out. Also depends on what type of IT weenies. The problem with the field is there isn't much standardization. It runs the gamut from folks like me who lived in school for 2 decades to fly by night certificates (certified ethical hacker, CISSP, and such)
 
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