Article 710, off grid dwellings

Mavipo0221

Member
Location
Florida
Occupation
Former electrician
Looking for some additional input on Article 710, specifically 710.15(A) for a home that is completely off grid with solar as the supply.

As I read it, if you have a home with load calculations requiring a 200 amp service, you'd install the service as normal, but the solar supply only needs to be rated to provide enough power to feed your highest equipment load, most likely your heat.

Does this seem correct, or am I missing something? The building code only really requires the home have heat, but if you were to do this, you wouldn't be able to use your range, water heater, dryer, etc etc if the heat was running.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Looking for some additional input on Article 710, specifically 710.15(A) for a home that is completely off grid with solar as the supply.

As I read it, if you have a home with load calculations requiring a 200 amp service, you'd install the service as normal, but the solar supply only needs to be rated to provide enough power to feed your highest equipment load, most likely your heat.

Does this seem correct, or am I missing something? The building code only really requires the home have heat, but if you were to do this, you wouldn't be able to use your range, water heater, dryer, etc etc if the heat was running.
Most "off grid" homes seem to have have propane ranges, hot water, and heat. Even refrigerators. So, really you don't need much in the way of electricity.

I suspect anyone who decides to live off grid knows the extreme limitations of what that entails.
 

ggunn

PE (Electrical), NABCEP certified
Location
Austin, TX, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer - Photovoltaic Systems
Looking for some additional input on Article 710, specifically 710.15(A) for a home that is completely off grid with solar as the supply.

As I read it, if you have a home with load calculations requiring a 200 amp service, you'd install the service as normal, but the solar supply only needs to be rated to provide enough power to feed your highest equipment load, most likely your heat.

Does this seem correct, or am I missing something? The building code only really requires the home have heat, but if you were to do this, you wouldn't be able to use your range, water heater, dryer, etc etc if the heat was running.
What is the probability that such a home will be inspected for NEC compliance?
 
Top