Wiring schematic symbol

synchro

Senior Member
I believe the "X" means that the adjacent contact on that line is closed when the selector is in the position that is labeled above.
But someone else here would need to confirm that to be sure.
 

mtnelectrical

Senior Member
Thank you guys, I am troubleshooting this conveyor, there were 2 electricians before me and they have relocated and renumbered wires, it is crazy, I just needed confirmation. Well, now I have 2 more wires to relocate. Let's see what happens now
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Really poor way of doing it. Should be labeled "3SS A, B, C with a note that says it's shown in the open position. If that's really what they are trying to say.

What do the three arrows mean??

-Hal
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
The use of the X has been a practice for many decades, just maybe not in your industry.
The arrows refer to the position of the switch 'Left Center Right'.
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Really poor way of doing it. Should be labeled "3SS A, B, C with a note that says it's shown in the open position. If that's really what they are trying to say.

What do the three arrows mean??

-Hal
That is the standard JIC wiring diagram symbology for selector switches. JIC standards have gone by the wayside I guess.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
I have most often seen it as a series of "x" and "o", with "x" for closed an "o" for open. Next to a contact of a 3 position selector switch contact that is closed with the selector in the left position, it would be "xoo" and next to the a contact that is closed in the right position it would be "oox". I have never seen what is shown in this drawing.
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
I have most often seen it as a series of "x" and "o", with "x" for closed an "o" for open. Next to a contact of a 3 position selector switch contact that is closed with the selector in the left position, it would be "xoo" and next to the a contact that is closed in the right position it would be "oox". I have never seen what is shown in this drawing.
I agree for control circuits, but in switchgear (e.g. utility equipment) circuits it was not uncommon to find the OP's style. Another variation is to have the OP's X's all on one side , under the position arrows, which was easier to read for switches with more than 2 operating positions, kind of like a truth table.
 
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