Why EGC Separate?

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
I'm inclined to agree with the guy who thinks the green cable is some kind of communication gable. I am not sure but it looks to me like there's some kind of a flexible conduit coming out of the other side of these things That's probably power.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
That is not an EGG, its a green data cable, device net, ethernet or similar. Those are valve actuators like Rorork, or Limitorque, maybe for a rising stem type valve, with a lead screw. Since there are so many valves, they are networked using the green cable. Discrete wiring to each valve would be a lot of wires!
What type facility is this? My guess is a treatment plant.
I agree, that's why I said the EGC is in the cord. That green thing to my eye is not a bonding jumper or serving some other grounding purpose.
 

Josh111

Senior Member
Location
USA
That doesn't look like a copper wire to me either. But bonding jumpers are allowed in some limited circumstances outside of short raceways, as was described here. I think the reason is that some would prefer they be easily inspected. But that's normally with things like LFMC. In the photo, it looks like there is nonmetallic cable supplying the equipment. In that case, I'm not sure it would be allowed anyway.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Technician
For you and me, Yes. Maybe not for whoever wrote the specs. IDK what we are looking at, why so much flexibility is required, green multi conductor cable or why they choose green.

Curiosity has be captivated on what they spcs writers were thinking.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
I think one of the reasons behind having an external egc, is on motors, the connection boxes are small, so one less wire makes for easier connections. Especially on big wire. Normally the external egc terminates on an external lug on the fittings.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I have done wiring in bulk fuel stations a few times. The tank/piping install crews usually run bare copper between items and around any insulating or removeable joints in piping, for static equalization purposes I would assume. None of it was ever brought directly to any electrical equipment enclosures. Pump motors is about only thing I had that is involved from the electrical system and the EGC is usually only 12 or 10 AWG vs their bonding jumpers of at least 6 or 4 AWG.
 
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