volt drop 117 to 50-70

tortuga

Senior Member
Location
Oregon
Occupation
Electrical Design
While a test box is fun to have and build I could not aggre more with Zbang:
If you suspect there are more of these "treats" in the walls, a real rewire would be better; otherwise you're chasing mystery AFCI trips and whether it's the end equipment or the in-wall wiring. Consider that most people will just reset the breaker a few times before checking anything else, then they'll blame the arc-fault for being flaky, then they'll try the vacuum/toaster/etc on another outlet, then, etc. Last thing anyone will do is suspect the wiring.

Or, AFCIs here are a board over the large hole in the sidewalk; they cover the problem but don't fix it.
Having bad wiring like that is like having a leaking roof. They just need to get a loan and have it re-done.
You could make a plan to do it in phases or sections?
I know these are tough times though....

Keep your test box for future troubleshooting but perhaps change one breaker to a standard 15 amp and hook up a bypass switch to route the branch circuit ECG thru a resistor like a 60 Watt incandescent light bulb (in series) to the ECG on your test box.
Then if it glows dim you have a ground fault.
You could also do some arrangements with the live and 'neutral'.
I got that idea from gar years ago on this forum, might be an old thread about it.
 

williamphelps

Member
Location
eureka ca.
You're in effect using two GFCI breakers, one being dual AFCI/GFCI and a GFCI only. That makes no sense to me. Why not use a single purpose AFCI with no GFPE circuitry and a single purpose GFCI? That would tell you if there is a fault whether it's a ground fault or Arc fault (even a nuisance trip).
 

williamphelps

Member
Location
eureka ca.
You're in effect using two GFCI breakers, one being dual AFCI/GFCI and a GFCI only. That makes no sense to me. Why not use a single purpose AFCI with no GFPE circuitry and a single purpose GFCI? That would tell you if there is a fault whether it's a ground fault or Arc fault (even a nuisance trip).
This is the breaker I am using that nobody seems to know about. It does not have GFI circuitry guys. The MOD3 version of THQL1120AF2 link to specs is https://library.industrialsolutions...lename=DET-719 CAFCI Shared Neutral Guide.pdf
 

Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
This is the breaker I am using that nobody seems to know about. It does not have GFI circuitry guys. The MOD3 version of THQL1120AF2 link to specs is https://library.industrialsolutions.abb.com/publibrary/checkout/DET-719?TNR=Application and Technical|DET-719|PDF&filename=DET-719 CAFCI Shared Neutral Guide.pdf
You called it a "dual" in your description. This breaker is NOT a dual function, it is a single function AFCI. In that case you do have a single function AFCI and a single function GFCI for your testing, which is what I said you should use.
 

williamphelps

Member
Location
eureka ca.
You called it a "dual" in your description. This breaker is NOT a dual function, it is a single function AFCI. In that case you do have a single function AFCI and a single function GFCI for your testing, which is what I said you should use.
It is a matter of semantics I suspect and there is dual used in description as well as combination both refering to the fact that the breaker does series an parallel funtions in regard to AF. I apoligise for the use of the word dual. At the time I new it might mislead anyone not famillar with this breaker. It literally has two test circuits built right into the breaker. Sorry for the mixup.
 

williamphelps

Member
Location
eureka ca.
It is a matter of semantics I suspect and there is dual used in description as well as combination both refering to the fact that the breaker does series an parallel funtions in regard to AF. I apoligise for the use of the word dual. At the time I new it might mislead anyone not famillar with this breaker. It literally has two test circuits built right into the breaker. Sorry for the mixup.
Here is some more tid bits on the breaker. https://library.industrialsolutions...NR=Installation and Instruction|GEH-41543|PDF
 

Fred B

Senior Member
Location
Upstate, NY
Occupation
Electrician
It is a matter of semantics I suspect and there is dual used in description as well as combination both refering to the fact that the breaker does series an parallel funtions in regard to AF. I apoligise for the use of the word dual. At the time I new it might mislead anyone not famillar with this breaker. It literally has two test circuits built right into the breaker. Sorry for the mixup.
It's a semantic that I get caught on often and have to remember when ordering over the phone, Dual is AFCI/GFCI plus overload breaker, Combination is either an AFCI or GFCI and overload breaker.
 

williamphelps

Member
Location
eureka ca.
It's a semantic that I get caught on often and have to remember when ordering over the phone, Dual is AFCI/GFCI plus overload breaker, Combination is either an AFCI or GFCI and overload breaker.
Yes I have literature from GE where they use the word dual and they are referring to the two kinds of arc tests the breaker will do. Namely "series and parallel". I dont think they use the words dual and function together, but the truth is series and parallel could also be termed dual function. Where is that dizzy emoji. 😵 yes
 

tortuga

Senior Member
Location
Oregon
Occupation
Electrical Design
Yes I have literature from GE where they use the word dual and they are referring to the two kinds of arc tests the breaker will do. Namely "series and parallel". I dont think they use the words dual and function together, but the truth is series and parallel could also be termed dual function. Where is that dizzy emoji. 😵 yes
Thats pretty cool so if you connect a 100 Watt incandescent lamp L - ECG on the load side of that GE breaker it wont trip?
 
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