Some odd questions...

Location
Arizona
Occupation
Young electrician
I always wondered if the electrical engineer gets a profit from designing the lighting plan with certain luminaries and lighting control panels or just copy paste wathever meets the requirements? I wonder because it's usually expensive and my boss clash with the engineer to installs regular 120v or 277v lights/swiches to save money for the costumer. Any info? Also, is there a code that prohibits installing more than 1 contactor 120v in the same junction box? Lastly, can I get information/advice about where to learn or get courses online about light control systems?

Thank you!!!
-Drew
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
A lot of what goes into lighting controls in a commercial occupancy are the requirements of the energy conservation codes.
Agreed, but I also just want to say that EEs don't "profit" from making suggestions of one type of device or another, they "profit" from having satisfied customers who get their projects approved and installed on time within a budget given to them.

When working as a consultant, I would have meetings with the stakeholders to discuss issues like this, usually involving vendors being brought in to offer their options to the user in terms of value, reliability, aesthetics etc. But from a performance standpoint, that was all me. If an owner wants to argue about fixture selection after the design was done and approved, that's their perogative, so long as they understand that the consequences may mean re-engineering costs and sacrificing the timetable. But if a contractor would "clash" with me on my selection, I generally ignored him (unless I made a technical mistake that they caught, and that happens). You knew what you were bidding on when you bid it, cutting corners after the fact to increase your profits is not acceptable unless specifically called for in the RFQ, usually referred to as soliciting "value engineering" proposals. Some users want that (usually Government jobs), many do not because it tends to slow down the job with the bickering. Even then, it's usually done up front, not in the midst of a job.
 

myspark

Senior Member
Location
SCV Ca, USA
Occupation
Retired EE
I always wondered if the electrical engineer gets a profit from designing the lighting plan with certain luminaries and lighting control panels or just copy paste wathever meets the requirements? . . . .

Thank you!!!
-Drew

It is a violation of the Code of Ethics for any Professional Engineer-- who is a member of any discipline of the engineering profession-- to engage in profit-making from any design he or she is engaged in.
Goading a client into patronizing one business over another is a no-no.

An engineer can be given a grant for a design or-- if he is employed, he can draw a salary.
If an engineer came up with ground-breaking idea--he can apply for a patent that some big corporation might think can be profitable. Then, the engineer has the option of selling the rights to his idea or draw royalty.

An "electrical engineer" , who is so called self-proclaimed (and I've known a lot of them)- can call himself an engineer at a place where he or she works--but he can't carry that title when transferring to another workplace. Only a PE can do that.

Only registered Professional Engineers have that kind of "luxury" having gone through rigorous education, training and testing.

Professional Engineers are awarded a registration number and a seal--that no one else can use. . . and the authority that they carry (registration number and seal) remain on the public record even after they die.
The authority however cannot be relegated when they die.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
I always wondered if the electrical engineer gets a profit from designing the lighting plan with certain luminaries and lighting control panels or just copy paste wathever meets the requirements? I wonder because it's usually expensive and my boss clash with the engineer to installs regular 120v or 277v lights/swiches to save money for the costumer. Any info? Also, is there a code that prohibits installing more than 1 contactor 120v in the same junction box? Lastly, can I get information/advice about where to learn or get courses online about light control systems?

Thank you!!!
-Drew
Also, is there a code that prohibits installing more than 1 contactor 120v in the same junction box? Lastly, can I get information/advice about where to learn or get courses online about light control systems?

Thank you!!!
-Drew
Engineers have a lot of time invested in specs and submittals so they will use products they are confident in. Although some times the specs don't get updated...I reviewed a submittal 5 years ago for a treatment plant that called for halogen floods, got that changed to LEDs

Contactors - This is more a UL listing item than an NEC issue. You can build what every you would like, I have built and purchased a lot of pumping plant panels, its better to buy one from a panel shop, they have all the parts to do the job, it will be UL listed and you will have a drawing/parts list.
In Washington an end user can build a control panel from listed parts and it has to be inspected. Not all parts are listed, some are component recognized and can not be installed by an end user.
On Line Classes check with the IESNA (lighting association), lighting control companies, Leviton, ask a lighting rep...
 
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