Some info on posts

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iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Hi all,

I figured I would post this and let you know what some of the moderators are up to. There are a number of us that feel we have been letting threads drift too much and that is not great for the original poster (OP)

What I am asking is that we try to stay directly on the OPs question and not expand on it until we hear back from the OP and they ask further questions. Too often I see 20 posts that have great information but are only marginally related to the OPs question before the OP has even returned.

We are asking that if you have info that is not directly related to the OPs question, and you cannot wait for the OP to respond before you must share it with us .... open a new thread.

They are free and that way it is your thread to do with as you want.



Here is what I see


New member: Is a weather proof switch required in a bathroom?

First response: See code section XYZ

Next response: What color is the bathroom.

Next response: What is the make, model, serial number, color of the thing you are switching?

Next response: In East Pawtucket they require fans in bathrooms.

Next response: You did not phrase the question to my liking, why do posters never provide enough info?????

Next response: Take the switch to a test bench, connect it to Binford 6723 test-o-matic and check the Retro Encabulator output, it should be 0.00001 to 0.00002



The OP comes back, reads this and says I am outta here, I just asked a simple question. :jawdrop:



No one should take this personal and I fully admit that I am guilty of it as well. I am going to make an effort to change that and ask the same of you.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Bob
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
*
IMHO I think this is a good idea for new OPs. Many come in posting a simple question looking for a simple answer only to find their thread drifting off from the original question without adding value to it. This is not meant to knock on anyone, and to be frank I am guilty of doing it frequently- but I think this a good guideline to keep threads running smoothly while efficiently providing knowledge to original posters.

Now, to those who know each other and are long time posters I think we can do without this in my opinion. At least I don't mind the current posting climate in my threads- in fact I appreciate it as it adds new depth and insight. But for an OP looking for a simple on the job conformation I think it does scare people off.

Only my 2 cents. :)
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
IMHO I think this is a good idea for new OPs. Many come in posting a simple question looking for a simple answer only to find their thread drifting off from the original question without adding value to it. This is not meant to knock on anyone, and to be frank I am guilty of doing it frequently- but I think this a good guideline to keep threads running smoothly while efficiently providing knowledge to original posters.

Now, to those who know each other and are long time posters I think we can do without this in my opinion. At least I don't mind the current posting climate in my threads- in fact I appreciate it as it adds new depth and insight. But for an OP looking for a simple on the job conformation I think it does scare people off.

Only my 2 cents. :)
I agree, we need to lure new OPs in a bit slower, play them longer with a bit more finesse before we SET THE HOOK!
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
*
I agree, we need to lure new OPs in a bit slower, play them longer with a bit more finesse before we SET THE HOOK!
:lol:

But in all seriousness I think we will attain many new members when we gain their trust that Mike Holt's forum gets the job done quickly and reliably. I don't mean to devalue this forum- but I think many people view online forums much like an app (myself included at times) wanting a quick and straight answer much like any other tool used on the job. Remember, its easy to get numbers out of a calculator or conduit fill from an app, but code questions are not something that can be answered without human intervention.
 

peter d

Senior Member
Location
New England

New member: Is a weather proof switch required in a bathroom?

First response: See code section XYZ

Next response: What color is the bathroom.

Next response: What is the make, model, serial number, color of the thing you are switching?

Next response: In East Pawtucket they require fans in bathrooms.

Next response: You did not phrase the question to my liking, why do posters never provide enough info?????

Next response: Take the switch to a test bench, connect it to Binford 6723 test-o-matic and check the Retro Encabulator output, it should be 0.00001 to 0.00002
That was pretty funny, but I enjoyed the "East Pawtucket" reference. :lol::lol:
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Guilty... I know I tend to ask related questions on threads, tho some seem so straightforward that they don't merit a new topic...

If the OP doesnt provide enough info or asks a question open to different answers, it's often times necessary to ask questions on unmentioned specifics. Location/code cycle is one that comes to mind.

It would be nice too if new posters came back with answers/solutions to troubleshooting questions. Some do, however many do not. I find it mildly annoying when someone asks a question of that nature, gets a lot of good replies, but never responds back with which one or ones (if any) were the solution. I feel the least one could do is come back and post that and thank those who replied as they probably saved a $100+ service call from a more experienced electrician.

btw, the Retro Encabulators made before 1986 require 0.00005-0.00008, only the ones made after require 0.00001-0.00002 output, unless of course the Marzel Vane Compensators were ACME models, which have no adjustment. ;)
 
All that, but....

We need to encourage new members to write more clearly and to use less local jargon (and to use punctuation and paragraphs...). And to check back frequently because there will be questions. So many times a question is asked, which brings 3 or 4 relevant questions about the first (often to clarify), and the OP never comes 'round again to explain things. That leads to tangents....

It ought to go--
New member: Is a weather proof switch required in a bathroom?

First response: Probably not (section ###), but there might be a local code. What city/state are you in?

Even better would be-
New Member: Is a weather proof switch required in a bathroom? We're in East Undershoot, Vermont and Joe at the barbershop says it is but I can't find anything about that.


Maybe we need an equivalent of the reporter's checklist- who, what, when, where, how.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
IMHO I think this is a good idea for new OPs. Many come in posting a simple question looking for a simple answer only to find their thread drifting off from the original question without adding value to it. This is not meant to knock on anyone, and to be frank I am guilty of doing it frequently- but I think this a good guideline to keep threads running smoothly while efficiently providing knowledge to original posters.
Thank you, you seem to understand what I have been strangling to put words too . (I am also guilty of it)

Now, to those who know each other and are long time posters I think we can do without this in my opinion.
Exactly, once someone has become a regular here things can certainly loosen up. :cool:
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Guilty... I know I tend to ask related questions on threads, tho some seem so straightforward that they don't merit a new topic...
As we all are, it is tough. You might ask a simple related question and it might get answered in one post, another time you ask a simple question and it takes off into a heated debate. Now we can move posts but typically that becomes very hard as the posts become intertwined with on topic and off topic info.

I can tell you this, no one is happy when their post is removed or relocated. :D


If the OP doesnt provide enough info or asks a question open to different answers, it's often times necessary to ask questions on unmentioned specifics. Location/code cycle is one that comes to mind.
For sure.

At the same time I find that a few members here tend to cop an attitude with new posters that they feel have not provided the info needed. This is not acceptable. If you are one of these members that gets ... lets say 'irritated' over lack of info my suggestion is to simply ignore the post. Don't post complaining that there is not enough info.



It would be nice too if new posters came back with answers/solutions to troubleshooting questions.
It would be, but we can't expect that.

I find it mildly annoying when someone asks a question of that nature, gets a lot of good replies, but never responds back with which one or ones (if any) were the solution.
I agree.

I feel the least one could do is come back and post that and thank those who replied as they probably saved a $100+ service call from a more experienced electrician.
No argument from me, but if we post expecting that we will be disappointed.


btw, the Retro Encabulators made before 1986 require 0.00005-0.00008, only the ones made after require 0.00001-0.00002 output, unless of course the Marzel Vane Compensators were ACME models, which have no adjustment. ;)
Off topic. :lol:
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
zbang, please do not take the folowing as aimed at you, you just provided the quotes to work with. :)

All that, but....

We need to encourage new members to write more clearly and to use less local jargon (and to use punctuation and paragraphs...). And to check back frequently because there will be questions. .

All of that would be great but it is not required to participate here and I don't think it should be.



So many times a question is asked, which brings 3 or 4 relevant questions about the first (often to clarify), and the OP never comes 'round again to explain thingsThat leads to tangents....
By the others, not by the OP.

Let the OP run the thread and take it in the directions that want to go.

If the OP does not provide enough info for you to feel good in answering the best answer may well be no answer.




Maybe we need an equivalent of the reporter's checklist- who, what, when, where, how.
On one hand sure, on the other hand that just makes one more hurdle for a newbie that is already hesitant to post.

One thing I have always liked about this forum is the wide range of members it has. From top engineers to first day electrical apprentices and so many others in specialized jobs that really add to the depth of this forum.

Because of that I feel strongly that this forum should remain a comfortable place for beginners and to that end lets try to supply those newbies with info at their speed not ours.

For instance when you can see someone is struggling with some basic calculations that is not the time to get into a discussion of watts vs VA when that is not changing the results of the work.

Bob
 
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