Patch panel termination

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
Right or wrong around here that's what everyone calls them. When we order them from the supply house we order RJ45 plugs and that's what they send us. Even manufacturers label them as RJ45 plugs.
No, I do agree. It's become like "Band-Aid" to describe an adhesive bandage.

When he asked about cutting the costs, I suggested what you dislike, plugging the runs directly into the switch, and omitting the extra terminations required for using the patch panel.
Believe me, I've done that hundreds of times too. And I can usually get the plugs right the first time too. (You get better the more you do.) But it's a PITA compared to using a patch panel. I mean, really, patch cables are a dime a dozen these days and patch panels aren't that much especially considering the labor and aggravation saved. In my quotes, the cost with and without a patch panel is basically my cost of the patch panel.

-Hal
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
The majority of our customers use patch panels, but we do have a few smaller customers that use the direct conection method. Both work, but patch panels look more professional. You don't have a bunch of unused cables hanging there if they are abandonded temporarily or permanently.
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
IME, most network people work have many colorful things to say if they found a bundle of cables coming out of the ceiling with plugs on them (starting with "Who's the cheap b*$*td who couldn't afford a patch panel?"). And with a patch panel you'll have close to no intermittents because once installed because nothing moves. Then there's the fun of terminating plenum cable onto plugs.....
That reminds me of a job I did a very long time ago for a new Allstate Insurance office. Owner wanted maybe six work stations with the server in the basement. It was the same story, can you do it cheaper. I remembered a cheapskate IT guy who didn't like to install jacks, just cables around the wall with plugs on the ends to connect the computers. So I thought why not. Should save a lot of material and work so that's what I did. I ran Panduit PVC raceway around the baseboard and came out with a tail and plug at each computer location. Other ends ran to the server location in the basement, again with a plug on the ends all ready to connect to the switch. All done and tested, I get paid.

About a week later I get a call from the owner saying that the Allstate IT guy is there to install everything and is having a fit. He wanted to know who the h*** installed that mess. I asked to talk to him at which time I told him that that was all the owner wanted to pay for. He didn't want to hear it. I asked what was wrong with doing it that way. He said it was unreliable and prone to damage. Those plugs are not as reliable as those on molded patch cords, and if there is a problem all he has to do is send the owner a new patch cord, not go there himself.

Needless to say I never got another Allstate job again.

-Hal
 

egnlsn

Senior Member
Location
Herriman, UT
Occupation
A/V/Security Technician
YES! That's one thing that really bugs me. Sure, everyone calls them RJ45s, but some know it's the wrong name.
Same thing with Series 6 (or 59 or 11) cable. Most people call it RG6, but RG6 is a MIL spec cable. The cable we use for CATV, OTA, etc. has a wrap of foil, which is not part of the MIL-C-17 specification. Major manufacturers call their product Series 6 (or RG6 type) cable, but most people just call it RG6.
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
Same thing with Series 6 (or 59 or 11) cable. Most people call it RG6, but RG6 is a MIL spec cable. The cable we use for CATV, OTA, etc. has a wrap of foil, which is not part of the MIL-C-17 specification. Major manufacturers call their product Series 6 (or RG6 type) cable, but most people just call it RG6.
Don't get me started. :mad:

Problem is most guys today weren't around back when the original stuff was what you worked with. Same with the RJ designations. There is a whole chart listing all the RJ configurations and uses back when you had to know that stuff. An 8 position 8 contact plug and jack had many different configurations depending on the use. RJ45 was just one of many wiring configurations that used that jack and plug.

-Hal
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
And then there are keyed 8P8C plugs.

I use all-copper RG-59 cable fitted with BNC plugs for my video-projector RGB-HV feed.
 

cabledawg

Member
Location
Boise, Idaho
Occupation
cable dude
How many cables? it might be easier to remove any cables that are attached if they are abandoned then start fresh. Dress the cables to the rack/cabinet then move the PP to the back of rack/cabinet to terminate for room. Or ziptie the PP to a ladder to terminate then move inside of rack. To answer your question, YES they are reusable.
 

steven765

Member
Location
earth
Occupation
engineer
Well, I do know both color standards, which to use, and when and why. That doesn't depend on whether you're terminating to a patch panel or plugs; you still have to be consistent and match what's already in use, if adding to an existing installation. What matters most is that both ends of each run are wired the same, unless you're making a crossover cable, of course.

Last decent-sized job I did was in a large home. I addition to two home-runs to the NID, I ran four CAT-6 cables to each of seven locations, terminated to keystones (and one coax and one blank insert) in each 6-port plate. I originally quoted the job using the customer's patch panel, and using 28 jumpers between the patch panel and the switch. In a business,

When he asked about cutting the costs, I suggested what you dislike, plugging the runs directly into the switch, and omitting the extra terminations required for using the patch panel. Besides, every caveat you mentioned equally applies whether you're terminating on punch-down jacks or on plugs: you must use the same standard and get every conductor correct.

My son and I got the runs pulled in one afternoon (single-story house, typical crawl-space work, switch in garage) and I personally made every connection the next day, 28 jacks and 32 plugs, tested every one, and all 100% passed. Maybe I'm weird (moi?), but mis-wiring almost anything just about never happen with me, even if you find it to be common-place.
You might consider taking the CCNA training. That's where you learn the data comm standards and practices, or juniper's training if you prefer. To answer your question by convention most everyone uses "568-B". B to A is reserved for cross over cables when you need to connect two switches together. The hook on the impact tool is used to pull the wire, patch panels are quite reusable, and cisco goes over that in their standards you always want a patch panel and molded jumper cables from the panel to the switch. The reason is when I leave a job, I qualify the patch to the port, give the person the fluke test report so they can't say it was my wiring fault. It also makes call backs much easier to rewire as people move a lot. You don't want the end being a hand made crimp unless you have to. Network wire changes far more frequently than electrical wire.

That said. Once you've made a few thousand cables. Sure go ahead. That's what I do at home because I'm cheap and I can diagnose it. For work, it's a bigger cost or hassle to get back on site.
 
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