Outdoor plugs, wet or damp qualification?

joecalvin

Member
Location
Austin Tx
We have an inspector that is saying that all outside plugs must have the weather proof bubble cover. The code, 406.9, is somewhat ambiguous on exactly how to determine wet or damp location. The IAEI publication uses the 45 degree rule as a guideline but the inspector says he does not recognize it as a standard. any thoughts on how to approach this?
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
What is the objection? You'd still want W/P covers, right? They're barely easier to use than in-use covers

Home Depot has several that cost less than $10, so I'd go that route, and change them later if it really matters.

Either that, or ask the inspector (with respect) to have his supervisor look and render a decision.

There are also the Arlington In-wall boxes, made for different surface types, like vinyl, siding, stucco, etc.

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hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
Outside would be an unprotected location such as on the side of a house or building. Damp would be under a porch roof that's not subject to exposure by rain, water or snow. You should know the difference between damp and wet by looking at it.

Outside requires an in-use cover. Damp only requires a flip or otherwise damp rated cover. That said, I have never used anything but an in-use cover for any location. To me, a "bubble" cover is an in-use cover and I think that's what the inspector is wanting.

-Hal
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Look at the two definitions in Article 100. If it's damp then no in-use style cover is required.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
The words "unprotected locations exposed to weather" in the definition of a wet location make it a subjective term. Some permit overhangs or porches to change it to a damp and not wet location, and others don't.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
The two definitions are pretty clear but the 45° thing might have some wiggle room either way.

Location, Damp. Locations protected from weather and not subject to saturation with water or other liquids but subject to
moderate degrees of moisture. (CMP-1)
Informational Note: Examples of such locations include partially protected locations under canopies, marquees, roofed open
porches, and like locations, and interior locations subject to moderate degrees of moisture, such as some basements, some
barns, and some cold-storage warehouses.

Location, Wet. Installations underground or in concrete slabs or masonry in direct contact with the earth; in locations subject
to saturation with water or other liquids, such as vehicle washing areas; and in unprotected locations exposed to weather.
 

joecalvin

Member
Location
Austin Tx
guys, I know you must use WP covers outside regardless of the classification. The issue is that in production building the cost is always an issue regardless of how big it is. Flip covers are cheaper than in-use HD WP covers. The question here is the classification of a receptacle between wet and damp locations and what are the hard guidelines for that determination.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
guys, I know you must use WP covers outside regardless of the classification. The issue is that in production building the cost is always an issue regardless of how big it is. Flip covers are cheaper than in-use HD WP covers. The question here is the classification of a receptacle between wet and damp locations and what are the hard guidelines for that determination.
Tell us what the installation looks like, you mentioned a 45° angle but nothing else. The definitions are there in post #6 in your opinion which one applies to your installation?
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
The specifications quoted in post #6 leave a lot of room for interpretation by the AHJ, like service disconnect "close" to the entry into the building. Even if 45 degrees is mentioned in non-binding notes, that still allows for AHJ discretion.
 
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