GEC

nizak

Senior Member
Grounding electrode conductor runs continuously from load center to copper water pipe that comes through the basement floor.

Halfway thru the 80’ run I’ve installed a 8’ driven rod to supplement the system.

At that point I’ve attached to the continuous GEC conductor with a listed split bolt and ran to the driven rod.

AHJ is saying that the “tap” needs to be irreversible.
I disagree.

Am I incorrect?

thanks
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
The GEC is still continuous even with the split bolt. Bonding jumpers to the GEC are permitted to use non-irreversible connectors like a split bolt. AHJ is incorrect. I would add that you may need two ground rods.
 

nizak

Senior Member
The GEC is still continuous even with the split bolt. Bonding jumpers to the GEC are permitted to use non-irreversible connectors like a split bolt. AHJ is incorrect. I would add that you may need two ground rods.
A second rod is required with the Cu water line serving as one of the GEC’s?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
A second rod is required with the Cu water line serving as one of the GEC’s?
The single rod needs a proven resistance of 25Ω or less. It's often easier to install two rods than to prove to the AHJ that your single rod has been tested and is 25Ω or less.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
A second rod is required with the Cu water line serving as one of the GEC’s?
Yes. A made electrode must be supplemented.
250.53 (A) and 250.53(D) run you in vicious circles...
 

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
The GEC is still continuous even with the split bolt. Bonding jumpers to the GEC are permitted to use non-irreversible connectors like a split bolt. AHJ is incorrect. I would add that you may need two ground rods.
"250.64 - Ground Electrode Conductor Installation: (C) Continuous: "....If necessary, splices or connections shall be made as permitted in (1) through (4). (1): Splicing of the wire-type grounding electrode conductor shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type connectors...."

For my knowledge, and you can PM me if you think this will flood the thread, but why would a split bolt be approved in this scenario? He is not suppling a bonding jumper, he is extending the GEC to two the means of grounding. Or at least that is how I am reading the thread. By extending the GEC they are there by required to remain continuous in accordance with 250.64(C), and there by required to be irreversible.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
"250.64 - Ground Electrode Conductor Installation: (C) Continuous: "....If necessary, splices or connections shall be made as permitted in (1) through (4). (1): Splicing of the wire-type grounding electrode conductor shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type connectors...."

For my knowledge, and you can PM me if you think this will flood the thread, but why would a split bolt be approved in this scenario? He is not suppling a bonding jumper, he is extending the GEC to two the means of grounding. Or at least that is how I am reading the thread. By extending the GEC they are there by required to remain continuous in accordance with 250.64(C), and there by required to be irreversible.
The gec is the wire that goes to the first ge. Everything else is a bonding jumper.
As Bob said and I stated earlier the continuous GEC goes from the electrode to the panel. All other connections (like a split bolt) to the GEC that do not cut the conductor are permitted because they are bonding jumpers not GEC's.
 

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
The gec is the wire that goes to the first ge. Everything else is a bonding jumper.
As Bob said and I stated earlier the continuous GEC goes from the electrode to the panel. All other connections (like a split bolt) to the GEC that do not cut the conductor are permitted because they are bonding jumpers not GEC's.
Thanks. I was counting the GEC as connecting the entire system, not only to the first GE because the definition of a Grounding Electrode Conductor is "a conductor used to connect the system grounded conductor or the equipment to a grounding electrode or to a point on the grounding electrode system."
 
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Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
If the OP is going using a supplementary grounding electrode... to me that is an extension of the GEC. 🤷‍♂️ 🤷‍♂️
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Thanks. I was counting the GEC as connecting the entire system, not only to the first GE because the definition of a Grounding Electrode Conductor is "a conductor used to connect the system grounded conductor or the equipment to a grounding electrode or to a point on the grounding electrode system."
By its very definition the GEC does not extend past the first connection to the GES.
 
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