Does anyone make a 60 amp GFCI breaker that'll fit in a Square D Homeline panel?

Shak180

Member
Location
94545
Occupation
Electrician
Got a call to hook up a hot tub tomorrow but it's calling for a 60 amp GFCI breaker and I'm striking out on finding something that'll fit in this panel

The panel is about 10ft away from the corner of the hot tub so it doesn't need a disconnect but it's looking like I need to install a standard trip 60 amp two pole in the subpanel and run it over to a 60 amp spa disconnect

Does anyone have any other ideas or is what I described above the best solution?

The hot tub pulls a max amperage of 45 amps on it's highest jet setting with the water heater going
 
Last edited:

Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
I'm afraid you're stuck with a regular 60A breaker and feed over to a 60A spa disconnect w/60A GFCI breaker. Although there are breakers from a different mfg that will fit, they are not listed to use in the SqD panel. I've ran into this before and unless they have come up with one, SqD doesn't have a 60A GFCI.

Since you have to go 125% for your OCPD and wiring, you have to go with the 60A.
45A x 125% = 56.25. Next size up is 60A.
 

SSDriver

Senior Member
Location
California
Occupation
Electrician
I would give a recommendation. Depending on the spa, if it has any drives on the pumps you would want to go with a Siemens brand GFCI breaker in the spa disconnect as they don't seem to trip randomly on pumps with drives.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
As a word of warning, their QO 60a GFCI breaker has no load neutral terminal, so avoid them for hot tubs that require one.
 

Shak180

Member
Location
94545
Occupation
Electrician
As a word of warning, their QO 60a GFCI breaker has no load neutral terminal, so avoid them for hot tubs that require one.
Interesting. I haven't opened the box up yet but on the SqD website they specifically wrote it's good to go for hot tub installs.
 

rnatalie

Senior Member
Location
Catawba, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Engineer
It depends which 680 you have. The one pump versions (Denali, Prado, Tacoma) need four wire hookups (i.e., they have parts that are 120V). The two pump versions (Edison, McKinley, Peyton, Ramona) are 240V only, and can use a three wire hookup. All the Sundance spas that spec 60A breakers have dipswitches that you can set to limit them to 50A by not allowing the heater to run while the pumps are on high.

Note that the Square D spa pack only has a 50A HOM breaker in it.
 

Shak180

Member
Location
94545
Occupation
Electrician
It was the Edison model. I opted to run a neutral because I figured the controls display worked on 120V and the GFCI breaker needs a neutral in order to function as a GFCI. The electrical instructions that came with the hot tub were pretty general. I'd post a picture of the install but it says the file is to big to upload here.
 

rnatalie

Senior Member
Location
Catawba, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Engineer
The QO260GFI has a neutral pigtail which is there only because they use the 120V electronics in all breakers (120 or 240). As Dr. Fine says, there's no LOAD side neutral terminal. The other QO GFCIs have one lower down on the breaker from where the hot wires are.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Find one. I dare ya. I double-dare ya! I triple-dare ya!! 😁

I know because I had to install a sub-sub-panel onto an existing QO pool sub-panel for a hot tub.
I've used them before as well. Yes they have a neutral pigtail for supply to the electronics, but have no load neutral terminal and is only catalog number they have for 60 amp GFCI.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
They don't list a 60 amp GFCI breaker in the catalog for Homeline.

I don't think I'd try other brand because Homeline is supposed to reject other brands yet their breakers are presumably designed to fit most competitor panels. Probably best to go with 60 amp std Homeline and feed a spa disconnect that does have a 60 amp GFCI that works with it.
 

Shak180

Member
Location
94545
Occupation
Electrician
It had "load" embossed on the side of the breaker where I landed the neutral wire from the hot tub

What is the purpose of the "load" terminal on the breaker if it's not sensing a difference in current?

I guess I've never really thought about GFCI protection in a 240V situation. On a 120V system the GFCI is sensing a difference in current on the the hot and the neutral. But there is no neutral in a 240V circuit.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
I guess I've never really thought about GFCI protection in a 240V situation. On a 120V system the GFCI is sensing a difference in current on the the hot and the neutral. But there is no neutral in a 240V circuit.
For straight 120V or 240V it is sensing the current on the two conductors that complete the circuit, grounded or ungrounded matters not.
 
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