Disconnect /Reconnect Utility

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The only time I ever heard of Electrians using Romex connecters for terminating a service was after a hurricane when they said the utilities were right behind them making them them up the next day and that was about 40 years ago.
This used to be done quite often but, as you said, that was 40 years ago. Under ideal conditions the POCO is supposed to come out after being notified that the service upgrade was complete. At that point they cut off your bugs (or whatever you use) and replace them with the crimps that they use. EC's used RX connectors KNOWING that the POCO would be out in a week or two to make the change. We are no longer confident that the POCO will come out in a short amount of time anymore so, RX connectors should not be used.
 
This used to be done quite often but, as you said, that was 40 years ago. Under ideal conditions the POCO is supposed to come out after being notified that the service upgrade was complete. At that point they cut off your bugs (or whatever you use) and replace them with the crimps that they use. EC's used RX connectors KNOWING that the POCO would be out in a week or two to make the change. We are no longer confident that the POCO will come out in a short amount of time anymore so, RX connectors should not be used.
Never thought about using a romex connector, good idea - in a pinch.
 

caribconsult

Senior Member
Location
Añasco, Puerto Rico
Occupation
Retired computer consultant
I don't know what your meter box looks like, but in mine there's a 200a breaker across both phases of the incoming 240, and I can throw that breaker off and we are off the grid. The connection is still live and the meter is active, but no flow.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
This used to be done quite often but, as you said, that was 40 years ago. Under ideal conditions the POCO is supposed to come out after being notified that the service upgrade was complete. At that point they cut off your bugs (or whatever you use) and replace them with the crimps that they use. EC's used RX connectors KNOWING that the POCO would be out in a week or two to make the change. We are no longer confident that the POCO will come out in a short amount of time anymore so, RX connectors should not be used.
We often used standard split bolts with Scotch pads and tape even on aluminum because the POCO would come and cut them off in a few weeks so they would be fine. One time we changed the service and did our usual routine with split bolts. POCO came a few weeks later to do the permanent connection and refused to do it because there was a shrub in front of the meter. Told the homeowner who said that they would take care of it. A few weeks go by and the POCO calls again "went there today and the shrub is still in the way".

On my way home from a job I went there and pulled the shrub out with my truck and left it in the driveway. Called POCO and told them it was done.

15 years later I get a call that half the house is out and they have no heat because they lost a hot leg. Go there late at night look at the drop with my flashlight, yup the POCO never came back. At least the split bolt lasted 15 years. :rolleyes:
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I don't know what your meter box looks like, but in mine there's a 200a breaker across both phases of the incoming 240, and I can throw that breaker off and we are off the grid. The connection is still live and the meter is active, but no flow.
We have some with breakers some without. Certain areas seem to be more prone to be mostly one way or the other.

Most the conversation is about making changes to the supply end of this whether there is a switch/breaker or not.
 

Peter Furrow

We’re not born humble, we’re born to be humbled
Location
Cape canaveral Fl
Occupation
Electrical contractor
15 years later I get a call that half the house is out and they have no heat because they lost a hot leg. Go there late at night look at the drop with my flashlight, yup the POCO never came back. At least the split bolt lasted 15 years. :rolleyes:
That’s hilarious! and ridiculous at the same time


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MTW

Senior Member
Location
SE Michigan
We often used standard split bolts with Scotch pads and tape even on aluminum because the POCO would come and cut them off in a few weeks so they would be fine. One time we changed the service and did our usual routine with split bolts. POCO came a few weeks later to do the permanent connection and refused to do it because there was a shrub in front of the meter. Told the homeowner who said that they would take care of it. A few weeks go by and the POCO calls again "went there today and the shrub is still in the way".
~...
15 years later I get a call that half the house is out and they have no heat because they lost a hot leg. Go there late at night look at the drop with my flashlight, yup the POCO never came back. At least the split bolt lasted 15 years. :rolleyes:
This is about how it works in DTE (Detroit Edison) territory. Inspection or not, utility or AHJ inspection. I don't do many residential services today, but I can remember ones from at least 30 years ago where the new conductors from the mast cap were left 6' long, for a mast re-location around the corner, to temporarily reach out to the existing drop conductors, along with a spliced messenger cable. Made up with aluminum split bolts, still there many years later. Even after calling in for a drop replacement, several times. If I recall correctly, that job had both a utility and AHJ inspection.

I like to turn up my split bolt splices vertical, to make a hat out of the split bolt and tape job, so that the water and condensation flows away from the connection, instead of into it. It looks a little unconventional, but it wears well when done.

For paralleled conductor risers and bus risers, it's not too practical to try and do it without a cut at the pole.

MTW
 

Electricmo

Member
Location
Missouri
Occupation
Lineman
The cooperative I work for doesn’t allow electricians to disconnect or reconnect. Liability reasons. Emergencies understandable. Our meters allow us to know if meter has been disconnected at any time or if power has blinked. I got called to a outage once where home owner pulled a CT meter and proceeded to work in his panel. Luckily he wasn’t hurt but his breaker panel didn’t fair so well.
 

Peter Furrow

We’re not born humble, we’re born to be humbled
Location
Cape canaveral Fl
Occupation
Electrical contractor
The cooperative I work for doesn’t allow electricians to disconnect or reconnect. Liability reasons. Emergencies understandable. Our meters allow us to know if meter has been disconnected at any time or if power has blinked. I got called to a outage once where home owner pulled a CT meter and proceeded to work in his panel. Luckily he wasn’t hurt but his breaker panel didn’t fair so well.
Just curious, What state are you in?
Also, When you say cooperative is that a utility company or is it a smaller sub -company that utility hires out?
I just find it interesting based off this post that there are some states or POCO that are more lenient than other states.


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Electricmo

Member
Location
Missouri
Occupation
Lineman
Just curious, What state are you in?
Also, When you say cooperative is that a utility company or is it a smaller sub -company that utility hires out?
I just find it interesting based off this post that there are some states or POCO that are more lenient than other states.


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Missouri. Electric Cooperative.
 

Eddie702

Licensed Electrician
Location
Western Massachusetts
Occupation
Electrician
So what if you have a customer with a bad main breaker? You have to pull the meter. Most times you cut the seal and do it but in our area some utilities use meter locks. So I guess in an emergency you cut it at the weatherhead if its an overhead
 

Peter Furrow

We’re not born humble, we’re born to be humbled
Location
Cape canaveral Fl
Occupation
Electrical contractor

sameguy

Senior Member
Location
New York
Occupation
Master Elec./JW retired
Shh, years ago my mom had here service pulled off during a storm, poco comes out, got to get a sparky out, mom said oh my son is one I.B.E.W., service was up and running 15 min. later.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Thank you for that information.
I coordinate with the utility company out here in Cape Canaveral all the time. And I’ve never heard the term “cooperative “When referring to utility.
Here are the ones in Fla.


you have the “for profits” utilities and the cooperatives which are a separate utility under the USDA
 
City of Phila are actually thrilled we do it all our selves. Otherwise that phone call alone can price you out of making any money. I especially like the connects when two homes share the same tap. The neighbor doesn’t pay his bills and swears your ready to shut his power off. “ My lights better not even blink”! Not a good time. I’ve been ordered down the ladder at gun point already. Needless to say that house is tapped with a tail left over from the service cable I replaced. Never forget that one. Rates up there with “Yea Larry got your money he down at the bar go down and get it”
Love my job
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Cooperatives are member owned and not for profit. Usually cheaper electric rates than investor owned utilities.
This.

Those not for profit utilities don't pay huge dividends to investors and then in turn end up with really tight budget and can't afford to maintain things properly. The non for profits still can have excess funds, they just get reinvested into the operation. Customers often get to vote on the board of director members.

Investor owned - other than the need to follow pubilic utilities regulations wherever they have operations, they sort of can do whatever they want after that just like any other private entity.
 

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Cooperatives are member owned and not for profit. Usually cheaper electric rates than investor owned utilities.
Cooperatives are member owned and not for profit. Usually cheaper electric rates than investor owned utilities.
I have never seen a coop with lower rates that the investor-owned utility in my state.
I am just far enough outside the city limits that I am on a coop. My rate for the first 1000 kWh is $0.129. In town, Ameren starts out at about $0.08.

Add to that, I get a “facility charge” of $38 just to be connected. All done my effective rate ends up somewhere around $0.16. The same usage on Ameren (homes 1/2 mile from me are on Ameren) would net to about $0.10.

1) Coops serve mostly rural areas. This means that the number of customers per mile of primary is a fraction of that of investor-owned utilities which mainly serve cities.
2) Coops serve fewer industrial customers which cost less per kWh to serve since the volume is so much higher.
3) While this has been changing lately, coops have historically had to purchase most of the power they sell from major utilities. I haven’t checked lately, but when I first got on a coop in the 80s, their wholesale cost to purchase electricity was just shy of the residential rate of the nearby investor-owned utility.

Maybe other states are better - I’m in Illinois where Com Ed just agreed to pay something like a $200 MM fine for bribing legislators.
 
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