Diesel fuel tank in a barn

Dsg319

Senior Member
Location
West Virginia
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Thanks guys. I should have researched more before asking but was lazy. Thanks for the quick reply I appreciate it!
 

Dsg319

Senior Member
Location
West Virginia
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Give yourself the normal working space and clearance you would for any equipment. I can't tell if that is a SE or not. If so, make room.

Gasoline would change everything.

You didn't ask but GFCI the receptacles.
The sub panel was already existing, I just installed lighting and the 1 single gfci..... than this morning I got to thinking about it and was worried wether or not that would be classified.
 

Dsg319

Senior Member
Location
West Virginia
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Well he’s going to do it anyway. I’d rather be on the safe side of anything and know it’s done right and sleep good at night. What do you think about having grounding electrode and #6 solid conducter to the fuel tank? Not as much worried about it getting energized from a fault but more for static in the cold months.
 
Last edited:

paulengr

Senior Member
Well he’s going to do it anyway. I’d rather be on the safe side of anything and know it’s done right and sleep good at night. What do you think about having grounding electrode and #6 solid conducter to the fuel tank?
Unlike gasoline diesel does not build up static charge. Normal structural grounding rules apply. For static charges the minimum is #8 stranded or sometimes even less. It is not NEC.

Try this. Cut the bottom off a plastic soda bottle. Fill with diesel. Light a match. Toss it in. The match will go out. Unless you spray it into a fine mist you won’t get it to ignite.
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Make sure the pump has an EG and don't worry about additional electrodes.

Flowing diesel does create a static charge on cheap hoses. That can make users rather nervous when they are fueling their equipment from a 10,000 gal above ground tank. Pretty interesting to hear it snap.

IDK why they spent that kind of money for tank, pump, fuel and put on the wrong hose.
 

Dsg319

Senior Member
Location
West Virginia
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Make sure the pump has an EG and don't worry about additional electrodes.

Flowing diesel does create a static charge on cheap hoses. That can make users rather nervous when they are fueling their equipment from a 10,000 gal above ground tank. Pretty interesting to hear it snap.

IDK why they spent that kind of money for tank, pump, fuel and put on the wrong hose.
They pump is currently 12volt motor with alligator clips for battery , customer actually wants to try and find a ac-dc converter for it but I haven’t even looked into them.

But even if he was to get one I could carry the equipment ground over from that.
 

Todd0x1

Senior Member
Location
CA
Fill Rite makes a 120v plug in diesel transfer pump. Its not expensive.

Any hose use should be the type with the static drain wire in it. Again those aren't really any more money than the hose without.

Here they make us have a retractable grounding lead reel to bond the equipment being filled to the tank.
 

rbalex

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Mission Viejo, CA
Occupation
Professional Electrical Engineer
Both the NFPA and NEC Manuals of Style prohibit referencing external Standards in an "authoritative" manner - even if they are other NFPA Standards. In order to determine if a material is subject to Section 500.6 one needs to refer to one of the Standards referenced in the Informational Notes in Section 500.4(B) [2017 NEC or earlier] or 500.4 [2020NEC]. The easiest to use for gases or liquids is NFPA 497. Alternately, one may refer to a product's Material Safety Data Sheet [MSDS].
 
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