College

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
Almost certainly! Theory in the classroom, with lab work to try things out. I remember one lab (I think I do) playing with 3-phase power-- getting 2 motors spinning, then syncing the rotation, and letting one become a generator and driving the other one.
 

dkarst

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
Will I be required to take basic electrical courses for an EE degree?
It would be helpful to understand more background for your question. For an ABET BSEE degree, the required coursework is remarkably similar, whether you are attending Stanford or InTheSticks University. These include ~ 1.5 years circuit analysis, electromagnetic fields, electronics, control systems, digital logic etc. You also have some technical electives where you can specialize in power systems, electronics, etc.

I would suggest just pulling up an on-line course catalog from whatever univ is nearby and looking at the required coursework.

I'm not sure where you're going with jumping into thesis projects as without understanding the basics, it would seem to be headed for trouble. Maybe help us out a bit.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
*
It would be helpful to understand more background for your question. For an ABET BSEE degree, the required coursework is remarkably similar, whether you are attending Stanford or InTheSticks University. These include ~ 1.5 years circuit analysis, electromagnetic fields, electronics, control systems, digital logic etc. You also have some technical electives where you can specialize in power systems, electronics, etc.

I would suggest just pulling up an on-line course catalog from whatever univ is nearby and looking at the required coursework.

I'm not sure where you're going with jumping into thesis projects as without understanding the basics, it would seem to be headed for trouble. Maybe help us out a bit.

I already know the basics and then some- I've studied them for 20 years now.
 

synchro

Senior Member
Location
Chicago, IL
Occupation
EE
You may be able to "test out" of some course requirements, it depends on the policies of the specific school. Even if I went that route I'd still study up on the specific areas of any course you take a test for, so that as a minimum you're familiar with the nomenclature they may use. Just as a simple example, I've seen vectors written in at least four different forms (under-bar, over-bar, over-arrow, hat or "carrot" on top of the letter, etc.).
Make sure you either have or get enough math background to handle the coursework, especially for electromagnetic fields where knowledge in partial differential equations may be needed.
If you find a college that interests you from online searches, as dkarst mentioned, I suggest contacting them to see if you can talk to a councellor and preferably someone in the EE department itself.
... I see kwired beat me to the test-out option. I think that a smaller school would be more likely to offer at least some flexibility in course requirements. At a larger college that is not usually practical for the school to do.
 
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dkarst

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
Want to see where you rank?
take the FE exam.
That's a good suggestion. If you passed the FE electrical exam, that would give you some credibility if you were then able to visit with someone in the EE department. If I remember correctly to sit for the Patent Agent exam you normally need a BS in engineering but I think they waive that if you show you've passed FE exam.
 

dkarst

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
There may be a problem with this approach as most states require you to be most of way towards your degree to sit for FE exam. There may be exceptions.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I think you can sit for the FE and take it without anything as far as degrees, but you can’t apply for you EIT certificate without credentials.

I’m probably wrong though... the requirements have tightened up over the last ten or so years.
 
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dkarst

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
The EIT or engineer in training is the 1st step towards getting your PE license and you typically might take right before or after graduating. It shows you have passed the FE or Fundamentals or Engineering exam. After you have gained time on the job, you can apply to take the PE exam. Here is the FE electrical exam specification.
 

Attachments

Location
USA
Occupation
Student
The EIT or engineer in training is the 1st step towards getting your PE license and you typically might take right before or after graduating. It shows you have passed the FE or Fundamentals or Engineering exam. After you have gained time on the job, you can apply to take the PE exam. Here is the FE electrical exam specification.
Thank you
 
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