Big Ass Fan

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Customer is looking at this fan for a porch.
https://store.bigassfans.com/en_us/haiku-outdoor-ceiling-fan-52-brushed-aluminum-standard-mount-white-1.

I was curious as to the description that says for wet location only. I can't imagine why it cannot be used indoors. Anybody have an idea
Back to your question...
I would about be willing to bet a designer or engineer told the website people and/or PR people it was outdoor rated.
those people or ones that do the .pdfs Just assumed and wrote “outdoor use only”
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
ElectroVoice used to sell an audio amplifier. Great specs, great reviews. But it didn't sell. Marketing types watched people in the stores. They heard it, liked it. Then they'd pick it up and look at it. They'd shake their heads, grimace, and buy something else. It was too light; didn't have the 'heft' of a quality item. They added slate end panels to the sides, and sales picked up! It 'felt' like quality!
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
Customer is looking at this fan for a porch.
https://store.bigassfans.com/en_us/haiku-outdoor-ceiling-fan-52-brushed-aluminum-standard-mount-white-1.

I was curious as to the description that says for wet location only. I can't imagine why it cannot be used indoors. Anybody have an idea
I see where it says "wet location only" but it says "only" in that single instance. Everywhere else it seems to imply simply that it is DESIGNED to be used outdoors, i.e. stainless steel components inside.

But this may be what it refers to;
In the Specs section, under "Environmental", it it says
"IPX2
Covered outdoor use" with an asterix, which then says:
"1 Covered outdoor use only. Not suitable for salt air environments."

So it might be that what they are indirectly saying is, "This is outdoors only, not outdoors marine environment."

Made for Outdoors
The Outdoor Haiku is designed for outdoor lifestyles. Specially engineered with premium materials and components, it brings cooling comfort when Mother Nature doesn’t.
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
Yep.

I am amazed how hard it can be to convince many 'younger people' that expensive things are not always built better, they often simply just cost more.
How come tennis shoes comes to mind?

Roger
 
... But companies always price some of their products higher. Because some people want to pay more.
Mercedes-Benz discovered this in the early 1970s. Prior to that, (and still, in Germany) their market segmentation was similar to that of Buick. Nice, good value, and a little upscale, but nothing spectacular. Then they raised their prices (in the USA) by 30-50%, served cappuccino & croissants in their showrooms, and sold more cars than ever before.

Ain't marketing grand?
 

blkmagik21

Senior Member
Location
Kennewick
When you run into this it usually just means they only paid for the Certified Lab like UL or CTL to test it for use outdoors. So they have to specify it’s only for outdoors. I’m quite sure it will be quite fine indoors. Just they have to cover their Asses on their big ass fans.

I’ve seen some of those babies btw with over a 150’ blade size. Ever in Costco’s? Look up. Those are usually the same brand.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
ElectroVoice used to sell an audio amplifier. Great specs, great reviews. But it didn't sell. Marketing types watched people in the stores. They heard it, liked it. Then they'd pick it up and look at it. They'd shake their heads, grimace, and buy something else. It was too light; didn't have the 'heft' of a quality item. They added slate end panels to the sides, and sales picked up! It 'felt' like quality!
Yes, saw that in Circuit City. Had a friend that worked there (all commission employees) and he sold many an amplifier on weight, not quality. (y)

CIrcuit City, still miss them. Home town corporation (Richmond, VA), started as Ward's TV. But, CarMax still exists!;) And that division did away with commission salespeople.

Then there was Zenith, that the technicians requoted their slogan to "Zenith, the weight goes in before the name goes on". :D
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
Yes, saw that in Circuit City. Had a friend that worked there (all commission employees) and he sold many an amplifier on weight, not quality. (y)

CIrcuit City, still miss them. Home town corporation (Richmond, VA), started as Ward's TV. But, CarMax still exists!;) And that division did away with commission salespeople.

Then there was Zenith, that the technicians requoted their slogan to "Zenith, the weight goes in before the name goes on". :D
I think it was Zenith that touted their 'hand-crafted circuitry' (ie wires soldered point-to-point) as everyone else was switching to printed circuitry. Sell what you've got!
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
I can remember back in the 70s that audiophiles claimed tube type amplifiers sounded better than solid state amplifiers so justified the added cost. This was despite the many blind tests that were never able to find anyone that could reliably tell the difference.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
I can remember back in the 70s that audiophiles claimed tube type amplifiers sounded better than solid state amplifiers so justified the added cost. This was despite the many blind tests that were never able to find anyone that could reliably tell the difference.
My high-school physics teacher made the claim the "Tubes hummmmm... transistors hissssss..." That does describe the background noise that each amplifier type can produce if it's poorly designed or degraded.

One general comment about each type-- when driven to the max, transistor amplifiers tend to clip the top and bottom of the audio waveforms-- tube amplifiers sort of 'round off' the waveform. Transistors thus sound a bit harsher when overloaded. Generally speaking.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
One general comment about each type-- when driven to the max, transistor amplifiers tend to clip the top and bottom of the audio waveforms-- tube amplifiers sort of 'round off' the waveform. Transistors thus sound a bit harsher when overloaded. Generally speaking.
Clipping also damages tweeters due to the harmonics created by the sharp knees that resemble square waves.
 
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